Monthly Archives: June 2015

DNA Nanotechnology Expert

Parabon NanoLabs is a vertically integrated DNA technology company that develops next-generation therapeutic and forensic products, which leverage the enormous power of DNA. Staffed by a uniquely qualified team of scientists and technologists, with expertise ranging from bioinformatics and oncology to chemistry and computer science, the Company is bringing to market revolutionary new products and services made possible by recent advances in DNA sequencing, processing and manufacturing technologies.

The Company is recruiting a Research Scientist with a high degree of patience, focus, accuracy and attention to detail to support expansion of both its R&D and commercial activities at its Huntington, West Virginia facility.

The position will have the following responsibilities:  Link to rest of job listing

DARPA on gut patrol

As any tourist who’s ever gotten a case of “traveler’s tummy” knows, venturing to foreign countries can sometimes be a little tough on the digestive system. But tourists aren’t the only ones who visit foreign lands — members of the military do as well. That’s why the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has given the Wyss Institute $4.7 million to develop a squadron of genetically engineered bacteria that will be able to identify, report on and attack harmful bugs in our gastrointestinal tracts.

Researchers at the institute, an alliance between various Harvard schools, plus other universities and medical centers, will be using the funds to create synthetic bacteria that will be able to detect inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. The bacteria will be taken in pill form. Link

Optogenetics Meets CRISPR

The CRISPR gene-editing system just got even better: a new light-activated Cas9 nuclease could offer researchers greater spatial and temporal control over the RNA-guided nuclease activity, according to a study published today (June 15) in Nature Biotechnology.

“This is an effective new system for extremely precise control of gene editing via light,” Paul Knoepfler, a stem cell biologist at the University of California, Davis, who was not involved in the research, told The Scientist in an e-mail. “Any technological advancement that can add in the precision and control of genetic modification is an important advance,” he added, noting that “this is one of many such efforts.”  Rest